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No.20 of 36 - The Framing Effect

The framing effect is a cognitive bias where people make decisions based on whether the options are presented with positive or negative connotations.

A potential purchase decision can be swayed in different ways by highlighting positive or negative attributes.

The power of the framing effect

The Framing Effect is certainly one of the most heavily used biases, which is understandable as it has a proven track record. It can be used in all types of retail situations from priming, to social pressure and emotional appeals.

For example, beef described as “75% lean” was given perceived as better than beef described as “25% fat”.

As an in-store guide, there are 3 different types of framing:

1. Attribute framing

Highlighting one feature of a product in either a positive or a negative light. When the frame emphasises a desirable attribute, the shopper is more likely to act.

2. Risky choice framing

Presenting information in terms of a gamble that will result in a loss or a gain. When options are framed in terms of the gain, the shopper is more likely to purchase.

3. Goal framing

Emphasising the negative outcome of not purchasing. When options are framed in terms of what will be missed by not buying, shoppers are more likely to purchase

How can retailers use the framing effect?

Brands and retailers can use the framing effect to change the way shoppers view products simply by using different words and images on POS. However, the same techniques can also be used by competitors. For example, while Company A may promote its product by saying it has a 90 percent success rate, the company's competitor can change the frame and say that Company A's product will fail 1-in-10 times.

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About Phillip Adcock

My name is Phillip Adcock: I have more than 30 years of human behavioural research and analysis, and have developed a unique ability to identify what it is that makes people psychologically and physiologically 'tick'.

Would you like to know more about how shoppers and consumers think? Download my FREE guide now. Alternatively, check out www.adcocksolutions.com, where there are more FREE downloads available there. Or why not simply email me with what's on your mind?

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Phillip Adcock
Psychology & Behaviour
Change Consultant

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